Monthly Archives: November 2014

A legal Eagle comes north from London

The first draft of An Uncommon Attorney was written in the first person, but my literary agent at the time, Andrew Gordon, suggested I change it to the third person. Here is that first chapter as originally drafted. If you’ve … Continue reading

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Common Pleas

This week I thought I’d share an early incarnation of John Eagle, which I wrote over 30 years ago using the first person past tense voice. The setting is Westminster Hall in late 1678 when the Popish Plot is breaking … Continue reading

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Words on ‘An Uncommon Attorney’. A review by Ann-Marie Richardson

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When the Attorney was common but fast becoming a snob

The attorney, often styled the common attorney, was a familiar figure in the English common law courts – i.e. Court of Common Pleas, Court of Kings Bench and Court of Exchequer – as early as the thirteenth century. At that … Continue reading

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1757: the execution of Robert Francois Damiens – why it haunts John Eagle, the Uncommon Attorney, and why it haunts his creator

  Robert Francois Damiens was 42 years-old when he died his gruesome death. They killed him on a cold blowy day in March, my birthday month: the 25th for my birthing and the 28th  for his dying.  The full horror … Continue reading

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