Monthly Archives: January 2016

Across the Great Divide – Chapter Twenty-Three

SHE FOUND HIM pacing the floor of his chamber at the end of the west wing. ‘Sis – you startled me,’ he said, his misery plain. His cheeks looked sunken and his eyes were puffed and raw. ‘So it’s true,’ … Continue reading

Posted in 18th Century Crime Fiction, An Uncommon Attorney, Creative Writing, Creative Writing Crime, Dark Satanic Mill, gentry, Historical thrillers, Radicalisation, Reflections on Writing, slavery, the law, thrillers | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Across the Great Divide – Chapter Twenty-Two

  ‘SHE LEFT IN the night,’ said Sir George when she went to his study in a temper grown worse by the minute. ‘That’s all I know.  Now if you’ll excuse me, Nell, I have business to see to.’ ‘Oh … Continue reading

Posted in 18th Century Crime Fiction, An Uncommon Attorney, Creative Writing Crime, Dark Satanic Mill, French Revolution, gentry, Historical thrillers, Radicalisation, Reflections on Writing, slavery, the law, thrillers | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Across the Great Divide – Chapter Twenty-One

NIGHT HAD FALLEN hours ago, fallen on the house, the park, the woods, fields and village, whose lights twinkled dully through the trees. It had fallen on the hills, wooded and bare alike, and on the moors that lay open … Continue reading

Posted in 18th Century Crime Fiction, An Uncommon Attorney, Creative Writing Crime, Dark Satanic Mill, Historical thrillers, Radicalisation, slavery, the law, thrillers | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Five Star Review of Dark Satanic Mill

Dark Satanic Mill grabs hold of its reader and transports them to a fearful time-gone-by. Set against the dramatic backdrop of the Luddite riots and the Napoleonic war, Miles Craven’s novel is more than just a lesson in history, it’s … Continue reading

Posted in Dark Satanic Mill, Historical thrillers, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Across the Great Divide – Chapter Twenty

CLOSE ON MIDNIGHT, when musicians were exhausted and dancers fagged, the steward appeared, condescending to bless them with his presence. He looked windswept, bedraggled yet elegantly dressed in a mixture of satin and velvet.  His colours were purple, very nearly … Continue reading

Posted in 18th Century Crime Fiction, An Uncommon Attorney, Historical thrillers, Radicalisation, slavery, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment