Monthly Archives: June 2016

Across the Great Divide – Chapter Forty-Two

THE DRIVER HAD stopped reluctantly, saying his conveyance was full. She hadn’t paid the fare at the coach office, so why should he take her, late as he was and forced to miss his breakfast?  Gone was the time when … Continue reading

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Across the Great Divide – Chapter Forty-One

WHAT CAME TO PASS next morning was exactly what Vine had wished. Sir George, nursing a headache on a damp and overcast day, was implacable.  Nothing was changed; she’d pushed him too far, and all her chances were gone.  She … Continue reading

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Across the Great Divide – Chapter Forty

VINE GOT HER answer sooner than he’d bargained for, and in a manner he could never have expected. There was no point in waiting for a banquet that wouldn’t come, for a visit from Lord Bute that wasn’t to be.  … Continue reading

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Across the Great Divide – Chapter Thirty-Nine

THE CHURCH WAS open as she’d hoped, as she’d dreaded. A single candle flickered at the altar, left there by accident or design.  There was no wind yet the flame burned unevenly, drunkenly was the word that came to mind.  … Continue reading

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Across the Great Divide – Chapter Thirty-Eight

AS MARCH TURNED to April Sir George got wind of his peerage. The wind was blowing fair, said Lord Pemberton, whose daughter’s marriage rehearsal was planned for later that day.  And for the real thing at the weekend he would … Continue reading

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