Tag Archives: 18th century crime fiction

Across the Great Divide – Chapter Fifty-Two

SHE SAT ON the bed in gown and cape, her head covered but her face plain to see. It was perceptibly softened; a sense of contrition lurked in the downward gazing eyes. ‘I come, you see?’ Her voice had reverted … Continue reading

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Across the Great Divide – Chapter Fifty-One

SHE FOUND OUT later rather than sooner. Summer had turned to autumn, and day to night a hundred times or more.  She was alone in body and mind, feeling now a fool, a failure, a fraud.  She felt it especially … Continue reading

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Across the Great Divide – Chapter Forty-Eight

SHE INTERPOSED HERSELF in the narrow space between them; it was her white face the man was seeing now instead of the black. His eyes, kindled by lust and hate, blinked with puzzlement; he was like a dog whose bowl … Continue reading

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Across the Great Divide – Chapter Forty-Seven

THE HOPE TAVERN was aptly named, and its inn sign of a man struggling through marshland on a stormy night fitted as an image to match. Inside, where an ashy fire smouldered in the hearth, thirty Negroes were gathered for … Continue reading

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Across the Great Divide – Chapter Forty-Six

ROBERT’S WORK WAS strange indeed, and getting stranger by the day as he explained a few nights later. He’d never known a man with such an appetite for reading, or for being read to, according to the brief. ‘He just … Continue reading

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Across the Great Divide – Chapter Forty-Five

THE SEAMSTRESS WAS indeed called Nelly but she preferred the name Annie. Sitting next to Annie, then, was Nell’s pastime for the next week or more, and as Mr Sharp had said, it didn’t take long to master her skills.  … Continue reading

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Across the Great Divide – Chapter Forty-Three

THEY ARRIVED IN London three days later, tired and almost penniless.  The bells of St Paul’s were chiming on the breeze as they clattered into the yard of the Swan with Two Necks in Aldersgate. ‘Seven o’clock,’ said Mr Strong … Continue reading

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